Emotional Pain, Mindfulness, Relationships, Self Wellness

A Dialogue with the Dalai Lama

An Interactive Dialogue with His Holiness the Dalai Lama

Friday’s October 31, 2014 Keynote

ISCS 2014

I sit here in silence with a deep sense of joy and a renewed mission to change the world.  I am wondering how can I  possibly convey even the broadest aspects of today’s dialogue with the Dalai Lama so that, you too, will be moved and inspired to live in compassion, move from truth, and know thyself.

Even before the Q & A started His Holiness, the 14th Dalai Lama talked to us for about 15 minutes.  These first 15 minutes were like being in a private conversation with His Holiness as he implored each of us to live a life of compassion and love.

His Holiness speaking to the audience, ISCS 2014

His Holiness speaking to the audience, ISCS 2014

The Dalai Lama started out by saying, “There are over 7 billion human beings on this earth.   With the emergence of technology and globalization we are all connected.  We are connected in the Oneness of humanity.” (Emphasis is mine)

The primary problem the world faces is a sense of we and they and this sense of separateness seems to intensify the disregard for human life.  Within the separateness of we and they, humanity finds it easy to bully the child on the playground or to kill others in wars.

World Religions

“Religion is supposed to increase love and compassion,” continued the Dalai Lama.  “If one believes in a God, then most assume other human beings are also the sons and daughters of God.”  This belief in God supposed to unify us and yet we kill, destroy, and harm our brothers and sisters.

His Holiness continued that in the past, science was used to harm and to kill.  He cited examples such as the atomic bomb.  He has collaborated with science to spread joy and compassion.  He has partnered with western scientists to document the effects of Buddhist practice on the mind and on society.

He made us all laugh when he said, “I do NOT need science because I am a Buddhist practitioner” but he collaborates with scientists so that contemplation can affect those 1 billion humans on earth that do not have a contemplative practice or religious belief.  

The Dalai Lama chuckled as he poignantly pointed out that when he says, “compassion and love will change you, your community, and the world” non-believers say, “that old monk in that old robe doesn’t know anything.”

The Role of Science

However, when western scientists began to document the enormous effect contemplation has on the brain, the self, and the community, non-believers all of a sudden started practicing contemplation, not as a religion but as a scientifically documented way to change one’s brain.

The Dalai Lama laughed heartily as he readily admitted he does not care how one gets to contemplation and looking at one’s mind.  Whether it is religion or science, the tools of mindfulness change how you look at yourself and how you relate to situations (suffering).   As you begin to explore those relationships, a realization of the continuous flux of how you relate to things and situations emerge.

This is just the tip of the huge mountain of what His Holiness shared in the first 15 minutes of his dialogue with us.  I will definitely write more about what he shared with us!

After about 90 plus minutes, as the dialogue was concluding the Dalai Lama grasped the hands of Richard Davidson (PhD, Neuroscience)

Dalai Lama states,, “Do NOT think we (referring to himself, Davidson, and Zajonc) are anything special. We are merely sentient beings. Go out and do your work.”  ISCS 2014

Dalai Lama states,, “Do NOT think we (referring to himself, Davidson, and Zajonc) are anything special. We are merely sentient beings. Go out and do your work.” ISCS 2014

and Arthur Zajonc (PhD, Particle Physicist) both of whom have mindfulness practices.  The Dalai Lama looked straight into our eyes and emphatically stated (in amazingly clear English), “Do NOT think we (referring to himself, Davidson, and Zajonc) are anything special.  We are merely sentient beings.  Go out and do your work.”

Go out and do what the Dalai Lama asks of us.  Whether you are religious or scientific, get to know yourself, and practice contemplation.  Explore your relationship with who you think you are.  Expand your relationship with the world around you.  Be compassionate and loving, and focus first on changing you.  As you change, you will move beyond yourself to change your family, the community, and the world.

A book for Mothers OR Fathers  wanting to work with the most advanced theories for creating the dynamics you desire in your family

A book for Mothers OR Fathers wanting to work with the most advanced theories for creating the dynamics you desire in your family